Union of South Africa (1930s)


Title: Union of South Africa. Souvenir Views
Photographer(s): –
Designer(s): –
Writer(s): –
Publisher: Beanes Photo Service, Johannesburg no date (c. 1930)
Language: English
Pages: 22 half-tone photos (10 full-page and 12 half-page photos)
Dimensions: 15,5 x 23,5 cm
Country: South Africa

2 thoughts on “Union of South Africa (1930s)

  1. A souvenir album dedicated to South Africa (mostly) and Rhodesia. Contains 16 sheets bound in on heavy paper, printed to the rectos only. These contain 22 half-tone photos (10 full-page and 12 half-page photos).

    Captions include:

    – Zulus

    – A Zulu Warrior

    – Native women dressing their hair

    – Abakweta dancers

    – The witch doctor

    – Ricksha puller Durban

    – Two native beauties

    – Johannesburg general view

    – Johannesburg City Hall

    – Johannesburg The Cenotaph

    – Johannesburg looking East

    – Johannesburg New Post Office

    – Johannesburg 50 years ago (showing an assemblage of small low rise buildings and shacks on a flat plain)

    – Groot Constantia

    – Hoffman’s Square in Bloemfontein

    – Typical golmine dump

    – Tropical vegetation Victoria Falls

    – Panning for gold Transvaal

    – Zimbabwe Ruins

    – Adderley Street Cape Town

    – Orient Beach East London

    – Surface workings of a Rand Goldmine.

    Original buff coloured card wraps with black titles and oval cut-out to the front, partially revealing a striking group of Zulus below. No publication date or printing history given, and no text other than the captions to the photos themselves.

    Like

  2. Diaries of James Chapin. (“At age 19, in 1909, James Chapin left New York for northeastern Congo where he served as Herbert Lang’s assistant for the next five years. Chapin was interested in many aspects of Africa’s natural history. Birds, however, were his passion, a fact borne out by these diaries.”) “160 publications including 120 American Museum of Natural History publications based on the material collected by the 1909-1915 Congo Expedition, 12 British Museum publications by Barry Bolton on Congo ants, 11 publications on African ants by the South African Museum and affiliated organizations, and 17 Congo-related World Conservation Union (IUCN) publications.”

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s